Powder Springs Memorial Gardens

Powder Springs Memorial Gardens was established in 1970 and is located on Atlanta Street near the intersection with Old Austell Road. The Gardens also back up to the Powder Springs City Cemetery located on Old Austell Road.

The first burials were the next year in March of 1971. March: William Doyle “Billy” Mitchell. April: Floyd Phillip Cooper, Jr., USAF; Homer Lee Echols and Ethel Inez Meadows. May: Dorothy Brand Hulsey. September: Bluford K. Byess and Paul Daniel Currier.

In the Memorial Gardens are buried those who were businessmen and tradesmen in Powder Springs, Cobb County and the surrounding areas. Some were veterans who served in war and peace times. Some were doctors, educators, pastors, mayors, councilmen, baseball players and farmers. There are families of the names Abernathy, Baggett, Brown, Cooper, Croker, Haynie, Hunter, Kellett, Long, Meadows, and Porter.

Powder Springs Baseball Players of 1920s and 30s: John B. McTyre (1901-1972) and Paul Edwin Hilley (1912-2000).

Powder Springs Baseball Players of 1947-48: Ty C. Porter (1925-1986) and Carol Edward Moon (1929-2011). Mr. Moon was also involved with the Powder Springs Baseball Association working for many years.

Push Rods – est 1950 – Charter Members: Wendell Gunnell (1932-2000); Sammy (Samuel) Hardy (1938-1996) and Arthur Clay (A.C.) Hunter (1911-1999).

Mayors: Gene Jackson (1926-2005) served 1965-66 and twice as a City Councilman, 1958-59 and 1962-64. Mr. Jackson was also Road Superintendent for Cobb County and a charter member of Doss Memorial Baptist Church. Roy C. Kellet (1925-2005) served 1971-1974 and was a WWII Veteran. Franklin Boyd “Doc” Chastain (1934-1992) served in military in 1951.

Powder Springs City Councilmen: Robert Ervin (R.E.) Long Jr. (1932-2009). Mr. Long was also on the board of directors for Austell Gas System for 43 years. He was President of the C&S Bank of Austell. After 45 years of service in the banking industry, he retired from Bank of America. Joseph Paul Bourassa, Sr. (1927-2010). Mr. Bourassa was also a Past Commander for the American Legion Post #294.

Theses are just a few of the Mayors and City Councilmen who may be buried in this cemetery.

Rudolph Byars Kellett (1927-2006) Postmaster 1963-1975. Charles Robert (Bob) Burkett (1922-2014) was a Rural Mail Carrier. Sewell L. Kellett (1930-1998) was one of the first City Mail Carriers in 1964.

Louise P. Clonts (1905-1993) long time teacher at Powder Springs High School and Powder Springs Elementary School. Bonnie Mercedes Keplinger Ray (1937-2018) taught at Compton Elementary, Tapp and Smitha Middle Schools. Mrs. Alta Harris Hardy (1924-2011) served for many years as a cook at Powder Springs Elementary School System for 33 years.

Vessie Frances Thomas Geen (1916-2002) was one of the five graduated from the first graduating class of Powder Springs High School in 1934.

John “Butch” Davis, Jr. (1961-2011) former owner of Powder Springs Amoco Station (now BP Station) and owner of West Cobb Towing.

John Hiram McTyre (1913-2005) Railroad Switchman.

Powder Springs Youth (Baseball) Association: Charles Robert “Bob” Burkett (1922-2014) Baseball coach for many years. He also coached football at McEachern and was involved with the Boy Scouts. Carl Moon (1929-2011) coached baseball for many years. Joseph Paul Bourassa (1927-2010) was a president and coach of the organization. Stephen Lynn Tessereau (1954-2017) coached Powder Springs Storm Baseball Team and was known as “Coach Steve”. e was also affiliated with McEachern High School’s Seventh Grade Baseball Team.

James Edward Wilson (1941-2007) established Wilson Air Conditioning Service in 1969. He served in Vietnam and was the recipient of the Purple Heart for his service.

Marcus D. Abernathy (1918-1990) worked for Lindley Funeral Home and Bellamy Funeral Home for 60 years. He also served in WWII.

Howard H. Croker (1924-1988) owner Croker Wrecker Company and a used car lot in Powder Springs for many years. He also served in WWII.

James Wesley Chambley (1932-2015) owner of Javelin Printing Company in Atlanta.

Rev. Robert D. Bitterman (1932-2003) was a pastor in Ohio for over 50 years before moving to Powder Springs in 1997. Here he continued working in the missionary evangelist field and pastoral training. Rev. Bitterman was a member of Calvary Baptist Church in Austell.

Stuart B. Powell (1922-2001) a retired City of Atlanta police officer after 30 years of service. He was also a WWII veteran.

Larry Barkwell (1940-1973) worked for the Atlanta Police Department. Killed in the line of duty. Jerry Barkwell (1940-1983) Sheriff’s Department, Brevard County, Florida. Twin brothers, both in law enforcement.

Chief David Wilson Hilton (1937-2016) worked for the Atlanta Fire Department 1955-64 and simultaneously as Fire Chief of the Powder Springs Fire Department until 1971 when it was consolidated into the Cobb County Fire Department. Throughout his career he developed and helped develop various safety procedures for the fire departments. He developed the Emergency 911 System, Georgia’s first Fire Education Department, Fire Arson Investigation, implemented Emergency Medical Service for Cobb County, Residential Fire Code with sprinkler system for buildings across the nation and internationally–just to name a few. Chief Hilton received many awards (local and national) through his career for his achievements and accomplishments. Also, through the years he worked with various youth organizations and his church. He was a charter member of Macland Baptist Church. Chief Hilton retired in 1994.

There are also numerous veterans from various wars buried here. There are only a few of those veterans. A “Thank You” always to all our veterans no matter when or how they served their country.

World War I – Plumer Talmadge Boyd (1895-1957) GA PVT Co G1 Inf Repl Regt (Infantry Replacement Regiment) and John H. Settlemire (1895-1986). Mr. Settlemire also served in WWII.

World War II – George Washington Awtrey, Jr. (1922-2013) served in the Navy and was decorated three times for his service: Joseph Preston Carter (1914-1994); Irene Kellett (1923-1987); George M. Haynie (1920-1991); Harkless M. “Hark” Kinsey (1919-2013); J. Walden (J.W.) Taylor (1923-2013) received Air Medal for Flying 50 missions over South Pacific; Furman T. Finch (1927-1999); Samuel Paul Thomason (1923-2008) and Jessie Leroy Long, Jr. (1923-2002) in Coast Guard.

Korea – Carolyn Anne Lester Piper (1932-2015) Army as Cryptographer 1950-52; James Harle Elbon, Jr. (1929-1997); Billy Crabbe (1932-2014) and served after the war as a pastor for over 40 years. Verlon Edward Maxwell (1922-1999).

Korea and Vietnam – Dennis E. Couch (1933-2018): James H. McFarland (1930-2004) and John H. Vann, Jr. (1933-1987).

Vietnam – Jackie Wright Allen (1939-2005); Bobby G. Bookout (1946-2017): Dr. SIlas W. (Wayne) Brown (1949-1985): Harold George Cantrell (1932-2006); Russell C. Mountcastle II (1935-2001) and Roland Kirk Rakestraw (1938-1999).

There is a marker for military service in memory of PO Joel Candler Stephens (1943-1968) who was lost at sea approximately 400 miles SW of the Azores eastern edge of Sargasso Sea in 1968.

There are memorial markers throughout the cemetery honoring the lives and families of those buried here in their final resting place. There are also markers honoring the memory of those who, for some reason, could not actually be buried here.

There is an American flag along the entrance to the cemetery. The marker has emblems of the U. S. Military Forces. Below these emblems it reads: ” Flags Flying in Memory of…”

All who are buried here have, in some way, all through their lives, helped make their communities a better place to live for all generations.

The Powder Springs Memorial Garden currently has over 1250 graves. However, there is still more room for future burials today in 2019.

The Memory Gardens is a perpetual care cemetery and is associated with the Sunrise Memorial Gardens in Douglasville.

Church of God of Prophecy Cemetery

Powder Springs, Georgia
1960

The Church of God of Prophecy Cemetery was established in 1960 and is located behind the Powder Springs Christian Fellowship Center at 4050 Austell-Powder Springs Road. This was the original Church of God Prophecy built in 1960. The cemetery backs up to the Methodist Cemetery.

The first burial was in December of 1960 of Eric Glenn Gilmer, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Lamar Gilmer.

The Church of God of Prophecy was organized in 1937. Their first church was built below Clarkdale in 1939-40. They sold that property and built a new church building in Powder Springs at 4050 Austell-Powder Springs Road in 1959-60. Ralph E. Bryant was pastor.

The church later built a new home just down the street at 4263 Austell-Powder Springs Road. Their original building is now used as Powder Springs Christian Fellowship Center.

In the Church of God Cemetery are buries church members and their families.

There are two graves at the edge of the woods on the right as you enter the cemetery. Alfonso D. Thompkins (1874-1949) and Fanny G. Thompkins (1895-1970). These graves are part of the Methodist Cemetery and not the Church of God Cemetery.

Charter Members of the Church: Elsie Ingram Hembree (1900-1980) and James Homer Hembree (1895-1972).

Members of the Building Committee 1959-1960: T. W. “Dutch” Ballew (1896-1970), Chairman; C. M. (Clyde Miron) Elsberry (1920-1984) also a WWII Veteran and Ernest J. Gordon (1989-1975).

Pastor of Church of God: Reverend Clifton L. Summerall, Sr. (1922-2011) beloved Minister who served twice. His wife, Ida Belle Spear Summerall(1923-2003) is buried by his side.

Annie Jane Summerall Herrin (1942-2015) who served as church Clerk/Treasurer, Sunday School Teacher and Praise and Worship Leader. She retired from Bank of America in Austell after thirty-five years of service.

Annie Mary Gordon (1914-2006) retired spinner from Coats and Clark in Clarkdale.

Marcie Hembree Hooks (1941-2013) retired from Richs-Macys after twenty-three years as secretary.

Marilyn Minter Ingram Stephens (1937-2013) served in the Music Ministry of the church for over sixty years.

There are also several Veterans from various wars buried here. These listed here are some of those Veterans. A “Thank You” always to all our Veterans no matter when or how they served their country.

World War II – C. B. Cleveland (1903-2000); James Wilson Griffin, Sr. (1925-1978); Jackson Edward Barnett (1926-2007); Howard Grady Bell (1918-1973); Ides William Gramling (1920-1993); Howard P. Pharr (1920-1981); Earl Neil White (1920-1999) and Rufus Lowell White (1917-2005). Earl Neil White and Rufus Lowell White were brothers.

Korea – Doyle F. Minter (1933-1975).

Vietname – Ken Murray (1933-1995).

There are memorial markers honoring the lives and families that are buried here in their final resting place.

The Church of God Cemetery has between 90-100 graves.

The cemetery is sometimes referred to as the Powder Springs Christian Fellowship Cemetery.

Al those buried here have left our community a better place to live, touching many lives along the way.

Note: The history of the church was taken from the information compiled by Annie Mary Gordon and Doris Hembree Gramling in the 1980s and 90s at the request of Sarah Frances Miller and Virginia Tapp. The information these two ladies provided are part of the archives of the Seven Springs Historical Society and housed at the Seven Springs Museum at the Bodiford House. We are indebted to these two gracious ladies for sharing this with us.

The Seven Springs of Powder Springs

The history of Powder Springs is the history of the relationship between the people and the seven spring located here. The area was originally part of the Cherokee Indian Nation. These seven springs were well known to Indians. The Cherokee and Creek called the site Gunpowder Springs because of the mineral bearing Sulfur and blackish sediment in the springs. The sediment was said to be ‘as dry as powder when the water runoff’. The Indians used the water of the springs for medicinal value. They would bring their sick to the springs to take advantage of the curative power of the minerals.

Pioneers, or white settlers, began settling the area as early as 1819. The village became a center for commerce. The springs were the town’s water supply.

The town was often referred to as The Springs, Springville or Gunpowder Springs. It was not until 1838 that the town had an official name. On December 29, 1838, the town was incorporated as Springville and the first Post Office was established. Then, on December 19, 1859, the town was incorporated as Powder Springs. Powder Springs may have been referred to as Seven Springs at times but was never officially named such.

MINERALS FOUND IN THE SPRINGS: Silica, Chlorine, Sulfur, Trioxide, Carbon Dioxide, Sodium Dioxide, Potassium Oxide, Lime, Magnesia, Phosphorus Pent Oxide, Arsenic, Hydrogen Sulphide, Alumina, Ferric Oxide and Lithia. (Information from the Geological Survey of Georgia Bulletin No. 20: A Preliminary Report on the Mineral Springs of Georgia).

The water table is very near the surface and there are many springs. All of the springs are small and none of them furnishing more than a gallon a minute.

Locations of the Seven Springs

The Spring located in the City of Powder Springs Park by Powder Creek was the most popular. It supplied water for the town of Powder Springs for many years as its only public water supply.

Across Highway 278 (Marietta Street) from the Lovinggood house located at the Brownsville Road intersection between the road and the railroad tracts.

Near the Southern Railroad (CSX) tracks by Long Street is close to the back of the last baseball field in Powder Springs Park and behind the house of Naomi Marshall.

In back of the Magnolia House on Marietta Street.

In the back of the W. R. Tapp House. A white frame house next to The First Baptist Church on Marietta Street. The spring continues behind the church’s sanctuary.

In back of the Service Stations on Marietta Street between New Macland Road and Siniard Street.

Located behind the second house west of LaFayette Drive (Florence Estates Subdivision) at 4245 Atlanta Street. This was the former home of Homer Scott (female) and the location of the Powder Springs Academy. The young boys who went there to school considered it an honor of being chosen to bring a bucket of water from the springs for the other students.

Powder Springs Cured Ailments

In the 1850s, Powder Springs was a health resort. Doctors prescribed a trip to the springs and treatments of various lengths for patients with serious kidney and bladder diseases, W.R. Tapp, Sr., was told by some of the oldest citizens that there was a hotel and a sanatorium in the park at the spring, that the hotel was destroyed by fire in 1859, and that the sanatorium disappeared in a few years. The Civil War put an end to Powder Springs as a health resort according to an account in the Mableton Mail, July 8, 1961. “The original building was a two-story one at the site of the pump house in the park. It was the town’s club house before the War of 1861 and reconstruction days.” This building could have been the one used as a sanatorium before the hotel burned.

According to Miss Roberta Murray, “In the early days of Springville (Powder Springs) the Pavilion was at the site where the brick pump house now stands in the city park. Powder Creek would overflow after rains and it interfered with the social life so the early settlers and their slaves cut a canal and changed the course of Powder Creek and built the present pavilion before the Civil War.”

From 1880 through the early 1900s, the park and spring attracted groups from neighboring communities and from Atlanta for recreational purposes. School groups, clubs and church groups picnicked then enjoyed the dance pavilion, the ball diamond, wading in the shallow water of Powder Creek and fishing in the deeper holes, horseshoe pitching, picking blackberries and other wild fruits, and spreading their lunches in the shade of the trees. The Southern Railroad ran special excursion trains in the summers, beginning in 1882, to Powder Springs. If the picnickers wanted to go riding around the country side, they could go to the Lindley Livery Stable and rent horses, buggies, carriages and wagons.

Political rallies and family reunions were held at the springs. Wheat Street Baptist Church from Atlanta had a picnic there. Local people had dances, wiener roasts, marshmallow toastings, box suppers, community sings and games of various kinds at the park. On Sunday afternoons the spring was a favorite gathering place for the young ladies and gentlemen of the town.

Printed in The Historical News Cobb & Douglas County, January 2018 – Info gathered by Sarah Frances Miller & Roberta Murray in the 1970s

Powder Springs Funeral Home History

Powder Springs Funeral Home originally opened in the 1850’s. The founder was Mr. Uriah Mathews. It was located in the area of town square. He kept the business until he sold it to Mr. Thomas Newell Lindley in 1899. At that time Mr. Lindley had a store and bookstore, and a casket room on the back of it. Uncle Tom ran the business until his death in 1937. On December 24, 1936 he hired Mr. Warren Watson “Pinky” Jennings. In 1937 Tom Lindley’s grandson Mr. Frank Pickens “Pick” Lindley took over the business. In 1940, the first actual funeral home building was opened. It was located in the Lindley Calloway House, which stands next door to the present location (now Mon Ami Academy). In 1953 the business was moved next door into the Walker Florence House. In 1968 Pick Lindley sold the funeral home to Mr. Gene Davis and it was renamed White Columns Funeral Home at Powder Springs. He only kept the business for three years, and in 1971 it was sold to Mr. Marion Heyward Turk. At this time the funeral home was called Turk’s Memory Chapel. Upon Mr. Turk’s death in 1980 his family sold the funeral home to Mr. Dennis Edward Bellamy. Mr. Bellamy still owns and operates the funeral home. Bellamy Funeral Home will open a new location in Hiram in November 1996, but the Powder Springs Funeral Home will remain in the present location. Over the years many people have worked at the funeral home, including Mr. Walter Thomas “Soup” Turner, Mrs. Mina Murray Turner, Mr. Marcus Dewitt Abernathy, Mr. Lloyd Duncan, Mr. Ralph Linton “Lin” Spratlin, Mr. Terry Pendley, Mr. Eric Jon White II, Mr. Duane John Baay, Mr. C. David Kirkland, Mr. Brantley Hastings, Mrs. Hilda McCarson, Mrs. Shelly Bellamy Palmer, and Mrs. Tara Genobles. Pinky Jennings continues to work at the funueral home, and on Christmas Eve of this year he will have achieved 60 years of service.
Sara Francis Miller, 1995, Seven Springs Museum Newsletter

An Old Home Place with Memories

An Old Home Place with Memories

by Sara Francis Miller
Powder Springs Messenger, April 1995

Near the right-of-way for the turnoff on Powder Springs Marietta Road to Cater Road sits a small yellow weather boarded house. It sits on a hill with a holly tree on the left. This is an old log farm house with two bedrooms and a kitchen. Another room was added on the house after the Civil War.

Here Jonathan Lindley grew wheat, cotton, corn and vegetables for his wife, Asenath and their five children. Nearby neighbors: the Selmans, Hunters and Pettys were friends. Jonathan Lindley like many others went to fight in the Civil War. Unfortunately he list his life in the battle. So his brave wife was left to raise the family. She had determination to make a go of it-even walked to Marietta with two other women to get a peck of meal.

During the war the Yankee soldiers shot in to the front wall of the cabin. The shrapnel splintered the log. A splinter closed the eye of the baby Asenath (Thomas Newell Lindley) was rocking. That very log is now in the museum in the park.

The house has had many owners: Tom Lindley, Fannie Turner, T.H. Scruggs, Mr. Glen Thrasher, Mr. I.L. Bowling and Nash Hovers who worked at Coats and Clark Thread Mill. The last tenants were a granddaughter of Nash Hovers; Angela and her husband Steve Tessereau. They have built a new house on Carter Road. Each family member has the vivid memories of living through wars and depressions and making ends meet regardless of good and poor crop years, stubborn mules, sickness and death.

Moving this historic house will help to make an easier turn for the motorist who may not be aware of the little log house with a shed room added to the back of the house. Hold on to the memories of happy carefree barefoot summers and wading in nearby Noses Creek and finding Indian arrowheads and spent Federal Army bullets.

Early Postal Service / Papa Was a Mailman

Papa was George David Miller, 1867-1955

Grandfather to Sara Frances Miller

A buggy that he used to deliver the mail is on display at the Seven Springs Museum

Early Postal Service Established in Mid-1800’s
by Sara Frances Miller
Powder Springs Messenger, April 1995

Letters were a way of communicating before the telephone. Post offices were established in each little community for the convenience of the people. We had post offices at Lost Mountain, Upshaw, Brownsville, Moon Station, Storey’s Store and Powder Springs.

Myrtle Kilgore says that there was a post office at Brownsville because she remembers hearing her mother talk about it. The mail came twice a week and they received a paper that was published twice a week.

Myrtle says she thinks the post office was in the old store which is no longer standing. The Brownsville post office was established on March 21, 1860, and discontinued February 28, 1906.

Moon Station was established September 6, 1895 and discontinued November 14, 1902. The post master was Mary E. Rakeshaw.

The Springville (now Powder Springs) post office was established April 11, 1836. An early post office in Powder Springs was in the lobby of the Lindley House Hotel. The office was moved across the street to a small wooden building on the corner where the Pat Mell hardware store is now located.

From there it moved to the spot where Taylor’s Upholstering Company was located in 1964. In 1915, Dave Miller built a marble front building on the north side of Marietta Street for the post office.

In August 1964, the post office was moved to a new building which J. B. McTyre built to lease to the government. This building was built on Pine View Drive.

The Untied States government built a $368,000 facility on Old Austell Road in October 1976. This office is more than five times as large as the old post office on Pine View Drive.

No government service has been more appreciated by the people than the rural free delivery routes. Tom Watson was one man who worked hard to secure this service for the farmers. This service began in 1902. There were four routes going out from the Powder Springs Post Office. The first mail carriers were G. D. Miller, John Hughey, Bud Moon, and Henry Morris.

These men carried their route by walking, riding a bicycle or driving a horse and buggy over the mudyy, unpaved roads. Among others who had later routes were Clem Chandler, Harry C. Miller, Judge Russe Wood Brannon Thomas, Carl Yarbrough, Bob Burkett, Lynn Garmor and Ronald Wolfe.

Clerks in the office included Dovie Bookout, Maude Westbrooks, Roy Tapp, Sarah Leake, Ray Hardy, Sharon Fawcett, Evelyn Elliott, Gladys Wallace, Linda Brantley and others.

Before automobiles were used, two of the carriers bought mail wagons. These wagons were enclosed and pulled by a horse. John McKenney had a red wagon and Dave Miller had a green wagon. There was a sign painted on the side that read “Mail Wagon.”

Sewell Kellett told the members of the Ruritan Club to get the houses in town numbered. Once this was done he appealed to Congressman John Davis to get city delivery.

City Mail Delivery began October 28, 1964. Robert Landers and Sewell Kellett were the first city mail carriers. When Robert retired because of a disability, Manning Hatcher took hisp lace. Since that time, Virginia Files, Earl Hammond, Anita Taylor and others have served. We have 26 mail trucks.

Following is a history of post masters and the dates they were appointed.

Lost Mountain Office: James A. Turner, July 5, 1848; Angus Johnson, February, 25, 1849; Andrew M. Faulkner, August 5, 1850; Joseph Ruff, July 10, 1851; Angus Johnson, August 26, 1852; John Moore, Jr., July 12, 1854; George M. Lewis, December 22, 1858; Henry J. Hopkins, January 25, 1860. The office was discontinued September 28, 1866 and reestablished June 30, 1869. John R. Ward, June 30, 1869; Joshua Jackson, December 2, 1872; Warren S. Watson, November 9, 1880; John C. Watson, January 14, 1884; and J. W. Arnold, 1898.

Upshaw Office (later called Macland): Isaac D. Upshaw, April 12, 1881 and A. A. Griggs, 1898.

Powder Springs Office: Charner B. Strange, April 11, 1836; Jacob Gimble, November 21, 1837; Jackson I. Kizer, February 2, 1839; Wiley J. Kiser, April 30, 1839; Andrew J. Kiser, November 2, 1865; Madison S. Kiser, February 12, 1873; Wiley J. Kiser, October 12, 1874; Henry S. Autry, April 26, 1881; Miss R. Marchman, February 13, 1883; Welburn H. Bailey, November 26, 1883; Jas. W. Smith, March 25, 1884; Welburn H. Bailey, June 26, 1885; Mrs. Kate B. Smith, April 18, 1889; John McD. Christian, March 23, 1892; Mrs. Kate Smith, April 20, 1897; Rufus A. Evatt, May 1, 1900; Belle Wright, January 13, 1903; Robert H. Buchanan, March 7, 1910; Roberta Murray, July 10, 1915; Awtrey C. Moore, May 4, 1922; J. Arthur Westbrook, January 11, 1928; Mrs. Estelle Tapp, July 1, 1935; Edgar R. Leake, August 31, 1962; Rudolph B. Kellet, September 11, 1963; Jack West, June 6, 1975; Mrs. Jackie Norton, January 8, 1981; and Clarence Nichols, February 1993.

Papa Was a Mailman

by Sarah Frances Miller

Powder Springs Messenger, 1995

This story was told to me by my uncle, the late M. J. Miller, on May 22, 1984.

Papa had a mail wagon. It had a window in the front that was hinged at the top. It could be pulled up and tied in the summer. In the winter, the window was pulled down and locked in place. There were two holes in the bottom of the window frame. This was for the lines or reins used to control the horse.

Both sides has sliding glass windows to open to deliver the mail. There was a small heater in the wagon until the mail carriers carried parcels. Then they used metal foot warmers with heated soapstone briquettes which were put in a tray in the carpet-covered metal box.

My Saturday job was to grease the four wheels and the fifth one also–the fifth wheel was really the turning axle.

Horse power was important on his twenty mile route. This was Route Number 3 from the Powder Springs Post Office. He traded horses often. He traded with the Irish horse traders who camped at the spring in the City Park. He even bought several from the Atlanta Fire Department. These horses would run if they heard a bell. George heard a bell at the New Hope Church and made a fast mile and a half to town.

Papa used three horses. Every third day, one of the horses remained at home to rest. He changed horses every day at the halfway point–his farm. The fresh horse enabled him to pick up or maintain his speed.

Rainy off days were harness repair days. He had his own repair kit–punches, brads and a hand bradding machine.

He drove his horse and buggy in the summer and the mail wagon in the winter for about 25 years.

For about five years he had a driver for his Model T Ford automobile to take him around his route. Various ones chauffeured him–Earl McKinney, Clyde Spratlin and Jake Miller.

His son, Jake, hurried off one day, sliding into mailboxes and then speeding up. Papa said, “You are going to turn us over if you don’t slow down.” Finally when they were about one and a half miles from home Papa took the spark and the throttle and held them together. So they really came in fast weaving from side to side of the road. Jake was frightened. He was afraid they would turn over.

The postman doctored his own horses. Onion tea was given for the colic. He cut up onions in a two gallon galvanized bucket, added water and boiled it about thirty minutes. He poured the tea in a long neck whisky bottle.

He put a halter on the horse and pulled the horse’s head up as high as he could get it over a rafter in the barn. Then he put the quart bottle in the horse’s mouth and rubbed his throat so he would swallow. The horse would baptize him with about half the potion.

Historic Baptist Cemetery, Powder Springs, 1840

The Baptist Cemetery was established in 1840 and is the oldest cemetery in Powder Springs. It is located downtown on the corner of Jackson Way and Pineview Drive.

The earliest marked burial is dated 1840 and is that of the infant daughter of W. Jaud Kiser, one month and 26 days. Her mother was Nancy Kiser.

According to “The History of the First Baptist Church of Powder Springs, GA” by Virginia Tapp, the Springville Baptist Church building “stood on the edge of the Baptist Cemetery on a hill just off the Old Lost Mountain Road. The lot was donated by Mr. D. R. Turner”. The First Baptist Church was originally named the Springville Baptist Church which was originally part of the Primitive Baptist Church in Powder Springs.

In the Baptist Cemetery are buried a number of the pioneer families of Powder Springs. There are Butner’s, Baggett’s, Compton’s, Goodwin’s, Hardy’s, Kiser’s, Landrum’s, Lindley’s, Ragsdale’s, Rice’s and more. Some were merchants of various trades, others were farmers, pastors, doctors and just regular town folks.

Elijah Ragsdale (1798-1858) was one of six charter members of the Springville Baptist Church. Reverend Parker M. Rice (1801-1853) was the first pastor of the Springville Baptist Church. Della Boswell Kuykendall (1875-1963) was the first telephone exchange night operator in Powder Springs for nine years.

There are several Veterans from various wars buried here, also. War of 1812 – Elijah Ragsdale (1778-1858) and James F. Blackstock, Jr. (1789-1852). War Between the States (American Civil War) – Joseph K. Moon, CSA, (1820-1870). Spanish American War – David B. Lindholm (1872-1914).World War II – Florence W. Neese (1917-1989) and Arthur Parks (1918-1953). Vietnam – Kenneth Lamar Newton (1945-2016).

The last burial was in 1979 until 2002, 2015, 2016 with one each.

There is a large open area in the Cemetery that does not have any markers that would identify graves in the area. However, the indentions in the earth appeared to indicate that there were burials here. In 2017 The Seven Springs Historical Society took on a project to have this area studied to help determine if there were actually unmarked graves in this area of the Baptist Cemetery.

The Historical Society contracted with Omega Mapping Services in December of 2017 to have this area surveyed by using ground penetrating radar. In January 2018, Len Strozier of Omega Mapping Services came out and did this survey. Several members of the Historical Society met Len at the Cemetery.

In the process he identified 135 unmarked graves, marking them with orange flags. Some of the graves were buried deeper than usual indicating much earlier burials than 1840 and could possibly be Indian Burials. Powder Springs has a history of Cherokee and Creek tribes living in the area. Numerous artifacts have also be found verifying their presence.

Len has provided the Historical Society and the Seven Springs Museum with maps and a CD with his findings. These maps mark the spots where burials are located. Once the Historical Society received these maps, Holland Supply was then contacted about ordering these markers.

The Historical Society then purchased 135 lot markers from Holland Supply. These markers are 3½ inch stainless steel discs and 10 inch zinc coated carriage bolts or pins.

In late March of 2018, several members of the Historical Society met at the Cemetery and installed these markers. The markers lie flat on the ground and will not interfere with the normal maintenance off the Cemetery. They can later be located by metal detectors.

The Seven Springs Historical Society plan to place a marker recognizing that these 135 burial sites are now identified and marked for future generations. The Society also plans to erect a sign identifying the Cemetery as the Baptist Cemetery.

Photos by Stan Kaady

The History of the Mimosa Garden Club

Powder Springs, Georgia
1940 – 2013

On April 17, 1940 all the ladies in the community were invited to organize and join a garden club. The meeting was held in the home of Mrs. Faye Lindley with twenty two ladies present.

The club was named the Co-Operative Garden Club. The first President was Mrs. B. L. Barton. The other officers elected were: Mrs. Cecil Barr, Vice President, Mrs. M. J. Miller, Secretary, and Mrs. Parks Lindley, Treasurer.

Other Charter Members were: Mrs. J. K. Brown, Mrs. W.L. Jennings, Mrs. Verna Lawler, Miss Hazel Lindley, Mrs. F. E. Norris, Mrs. K. E. Norris, Mrs. W. R. Tapp, Sr. and Mrs. J. C. Vaughn.

This may not be complete due to the original list being lost at some point.

Their pledge as gardeners was to do all in their power to take care of our trees, flowers and birds, and to watch for opportunities to make and keep our community clean and beautiful. The Club would met in the homes of the members once a month. Dues were set at ten cents a month. The members had certain requirements. Each one was to plant three mimosa trees. At every meeting, each member was to bring an arrangement of flowers. These could be a miniature not over eight inches tall, a single specimen or a tall arrangement to be judged.

In April of 1941, the Club changed its name the Mimosa Garden Club and was federated. In November of the same year, the Club was affiliated with the Garden Club of Georgia, and later the National Council of Garden Clubs, and the Marietta Educational Garden Center.

The members have kept their pledge through community and individual projects. They sponsored side walk plantings of watermelon red crepe myrtles in 1942. These grew so large that they obscured the vision of the motorist and had to be cut down later. At this time the total membership was limited to twenty five ladies. During the war years (1941 – 1945), programs and exhibits were changed to Victory Vegetable Gardens and canned food exhibits. The members donated cooking fats which they had saved. The Club received a small amount of money and red food stamps. The food stamps were given to the school cafeteria.

In 1944 Mrs. Thomas (Louise) Clonts sponsored a Junior Garden Club named the Dirt Daubers. It was not active after 1945.

After the war, the Mimosa Garden Club returned to keeping their pledge as gardeners to take care and keep the community clean and beautiful. They continued to study horticulture, flower arranging and how to help maintain the trees, flowers, herbs, birds and butterflies in the community. Many outstanding arrangements have been made by the members over the years.

In the 1950’s they sponsored a Georgia Power Cooking School. They sponsored more than eight flower shows and sent arrangements made by various members to the Cobb County Fair where they won several blue ribbons. They also sent flowers and arrangements to Rich’s Garden Center.

In 1978 Mrs. Faye Lindley inspired the Garden Club to set up a Meditation Garden at the Powder Springs City Cemetery. The ladies have continued to maintain this garden over the years.

The Club decided to landscape the Powder Springs Park. Hastings Seed Company offered their assistance in making a plan. Roses, Iris, and Magnolia Trees were planted there.

In the 1980’s they bought barrels for the downtown area of Powder Springs which they planted and maintained. They planted bulbs at the new Powder Springs Civic Center (The Ron Anderson Memorial Center).

In 1984, the Club helped with organizing the Powder Springs Beautification Committee. On December 13, 1984, there was an event commemorating the Certification of the Committee. Harold Norris was The Team Leader in this project. He was one of the charter Members of the Seven Springs Historical Society. In later years, the Powder Springs Beautification Committee changed its name to Keep Powder Springs Beautiful Association, and are currently still active.

In 1988, Mrs. Willie Mae Godfrey led the Club to establish a Memorial for the members at the Seven Springs Historical Society Museum in Powder Springs Park. Trees were planted in honor and memory of several of the members who had passed away.

In 1989, with the help of Imogene Abernathy and Bonnie Yeager the club planted an herb garden at the Seven Springs Museum.

The Garden Club also asked the Mayor to call a public meeting to establish a Powder Springs Cemetery Association to provided perpetual care. (City Cemetery located on Old Austell Road on the right). This project has been successful and supported by the community.

Through the years many ladies, individually, have made flower Gardens, Rock Gardens, Herb Gardens, day lily gardens, and a colorful cottage garden. Mrs. Martha Brown landscaped her own yard to reflect the beauty of Calloway Gardens. Imogene Abernathy planted a unique herb garden at her home. Several of the members especially worked with horticulture.

Mrs. Martha Brown and Mrs. Dot Burkett faithfully provided special flower arrangements for the Baptist and Methodist Churches for many years. Others have worked on yearbooks and scrapbooks for the Garden Club, winning many awards. During the 1990’s there were many projects undertaken by the Garden Club.

They planted flowers, trees, landscaping on the Grounds of the newly organized Powder Springs Senior Center at the Old Powder Springs Elementary School.

A Butterfly Garden was planted with flowers that would attract the Butterflies, at the Seven Springs Historical Society Museum. Stepping Stones were installed using old grind stones from the Murray Landrum grist mill that had operated in Powder Springs in the early 1900’s. These stones were donated to the Museum by Marsha Doughtery.

A golden path of flowers was planted in honor of the 1996 Olympics. These flowers were planted in 1995 so that they would be in bloom during the Olympics. Snapdragons, marigolds, dahlias, daises, roses, lilies among others that are beautiful.

The Club built Butterfly and Blue Bird House. Some were hung around town and others were sold as fundraisers.

Mrs. Patti Briel and Mrs. Betty DuPre won a state award in 1995 with the Club’s scrapbook.

As the twenty first century came, things were changing which offered new challenges for the Mimosa Garden Club. The years 2000 through 2013 were not as well documented as the earlier ones. However, they left a lot of their scrapbooks, Minutes of meetings, collection of books and various other documents to the Seven Springs Historical Society and are housed at the Museum where we welcome anyone who wishes may come and enjoy their handiwork.

The Mimosa Garden Club continued to work to carry out their Pledge to take care of our trees, flowers and birds and to watch watch for opportunities to make and keep our community clean and beautiful.

The Club continued maintaining the flower and herb gardens and trees they had planted around the Seven Springs Museum. When we experienced the flood in 2009, they helped to revitalize and care for the flowers, herbs and trees around the Museum and other areas in the community.

The Garden Club actually contributed and supported the Garden Clubs and organizations they were members of all through the many years they existed. They worked with these organizations on various projects around the Community, County and State, supporting them monetarily or by volunteering in any way that was needed.

The Garden Club also supported many charities over the years with donations, making crafts for their residences, fund raising and volunteering. Some of these included: the restoration of the Garden Center in Marietta; Open Gate Home for the abused and homeless children; Cobb County Beautiful Roadways with wild flowers on the medians; the American Cancer Society; and Milledgeville Garden Therapy Program at the State Mental Hospital.

The Club continued to increase their knowledge, enjoyment by Members going on field trips to see the many gardens and Horticulture Centers around the state and visiting the Biltmore Estates Gardens in North Carolina.

Even though the Mimosa Garden Club was disbanded in 2013, they will always be known for their many kinds of contributions and their enjoyment for the preservation of all of Nature’s Beauty. The Club, in it’s seventy three years of service, has left its Legacy in many of the trees, gardens and flowers that they had planted throughout the Community

As a member of the Garden Club of Georgia, the Mimosa Garden Club was presented with a large circular sign depicting the Garden Club of Georgia’s logo. The sign was originally erected at the parking area of the old Seven Springs Museum in the trees and flower gardens they had planted.

When the Seven Springs Museum moved to the Bodiford House, the sign was moved and hung on the back wall of the house under the screened in porch for all to enjoy when they park their cars at the Museum.

In 2017, the Seven Springs Historical Society acknowledged and Honored the Mimosa Garden Club, it’s members and charter members for their contribution to the community and the Seven Springs Historical Society and Museum with a plaque which is displayed in the Museum.

This 2018 history of the Mimosa Garden Club has been compiled from information gathered by Sarah Frances Miller, various Club documents, notes, scrapbooks and Minutes of their meetings.