Historic Lost Mountain Store 1881 – 1992

When people think of Lost Mountain, they may think about the mountain itself. Others may think about the old Lost Mountain store. The old store sits on its original site at the foot of Lost Mountain, much of which has has been lost to development oer the years. Located on the Dallas Highway (Highway 176) and the intersection of Lost Mountain Road and Mars Hill Road (Highway 120). It is now the home of United Community Bank.

In 1864, the Lost Mountain community and surrounding areas were the sites for both the Union and Confederate positions. Some areas of the community saw skirmishes and battles from Dallas to Kennesaw to Marietta as the armies moved on to Atlanta.

Up until the mid-1800’s the land along the Dallas Highway in Lost Mountain was undeveloped land. The few residences of the area were mostly farmers and/or dairymen. The area was previously home to the Cherokee and Creek Indians.

Judge Aaron Lafayette Bartlett had the vision of developing this land into much more than just farm land and pastures. He earned enough money plowing field s to purchase two hundred acres of this property and a house for the sum of $2.95. The, using bricks he made himself and mortar made from lime and sand, Bartlett completed the Lost Mountain Store in 1881 and opened it for business. As he was helped a great deal by his brother-in-law John Coleman Watson, the store was called The Watson and Bartlett Store. Watson ran the store on a daily basis.

People came from miles around by horse and buggy to trade at the store by selling goods for staples. The store was said to be “of service for life” carrying everything a person would need from baby needs to burial supplies!

In 1884, John Coleman Watson was given the title ‘Postmaster General’ for the Lost Mountain district. Mail was to be delivered to the store once a week.

About nine years later, Mr. Watson chose to seek opportunities in Dallas. In 1893, Josiah “Joe” Wilson Arnold, a family friend of Judge Bartlett, became the second manager of the Lost Mountain Store.

Joe and his wife Mintorah and their children worked the fields and ran the store for several years. During which time, the store expanded its inventory to include plows, other farm equipment, fabric, and household goods.

As the Lost Mountain district grew, the store became the meeting place for the community, hosting town meetings and elections. Then in 1922, after the sudden death of his wife, Joe left the mountain and the store.

In 1923, Levi Sanford of Paulding County, a close friend of the Bartletts, became the next resident manager of the Lost Mountain Store. Two years later, Levi’s 18-year-old son, Newt, was named operating manager of the store. There was much change during Newt’s time as the store’s owner: from the Great Depression, automobiles, through wars to the birth and growth of super markets and shopping malls.

In 1992, after nearly 70 years at the helm of the Lost Mountain Store, Newt Sanford ‘took sick’ and retired to Cave Spring, GA.

Some 111 years after opening for business, the Lost Mountain Store closed its doors. The building then remained empty for some time, used only as a backdrop for photos, inspiration for paintings and source for memories of years gone by.

In 1995 Independent Bank and Trust Company, now United Community Bank, began exploring sites for its first bank branch. The bank purchased the Lost Mountain Store and began to carefully restore the building to its original glory. In 1996, the building re-opened as a full service bank.

The interior paint color, windows, doors, and pine tongue-and-groove floor were restored to match the original building. A single 2′ by 6′ board removed from the original store counter now serves as a conference room table. Replicas of the original gas pumps that supplied many cars with fuel stand near the porch as they did long ago.

An addition to the rear of the store housed the bank’s secured items and provides space for the equipment and utilities required in a modern banking facility.

Since 1881, the Lost Mountain Store has been a center of commerce and customer service, as well as part of the landscape.

For most of the building’s history as a mercantile center, customers could find anything they needed within the store’s walls.

Source: Information on the actual history of the Lost Mountain store is in a promotional brochure published by the United Community Bank taken from “Historic Lost Mountain Store – Traditional Values; New Ideas” by Carol Christian Wallace.

There is also a more detailed history of the Lost Mountain Store on file at the Seven Springs Museum.

Miscellaneous Articles and Advertisements

We have some interesting information from various newspapers about Powder Springs from 1910 to 1967. This is just a sampling of what you will find on file in the Research Room at the Seven Springs Museum.

Powder Springs Pioneer – 1910
JOY TO THE BANKERS HEART – This dependable man is the only one that brings joy to the banker’s heart. He is the kink the banks likes to do business with. Whatever the size of the obligation, be it $50 or $5,000, if a man cannot meet it when due, he should be at the bank “on the dot” and explain why. The bank is always ready and willing to explain anything in connection with its own business and expects its customers to do the same. A man should not have anything in his business which he cannot lay before his banker. However much he may think he has a right to cover up things regarding his business from the public, this “right” does not extend to his banker, and unless he is willing to give his banker his entire confidence he may reason to expect the assistance it is in the power of the banker to render. The joy of the banker’s heart is the man who may be absolutely depended upon first, last, and all the time. If any young man starting in business has an idea that character is not a business asset of the highest order, let him talk to some banker about it and he will have cause to change his mind. We solicit the business of a few more dependable men. BANK OF POWDER SPRINGS, J. M. COMER, Cashier. (Note: Wonder how much business this really generated for the bank????)

Marietta Journal – August 4, 1921
M. W. COMPTON Specializes in Staple and Fancy Groceries ALSO a full Line of Cold, Bottled Drinks, and Tobaccos – both Chewing and smoking. My prices on FEED STUFF, SHOES, DRY GOODS, HARDWARE, HARNESS, COLLARS, BRIDLES Cannot be surpassed in Marietta or Atlanta. You will save time, a long haul and money to see me about any of these things you need. Whatever you want you can get at COMPTON’S. Powder Springs, Ga.

B. L. HILLEY – Headquarters for Cold Drinks and Hot Lunches. The only restaurant in Powder Springs. I cater to your Stomach. See me for Candies and Fancy Groceries. Powder Springs, Ga.

DUNCAN’S GARAGE – Overhauls Ford Motors and makes the work whether they want to or not. We also specialize in General Repair Work on ALL Makes of Cars. In charging storage batteries; In Vulcanizing Castings and Tubes WE CARRY ALL KINDS OF PARTS, OILS AND GASOLINE. Our services cannot be surpassed in this section of The state and what is still —- OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST —- That can be found, considering the services rendered. Why go elsewhere When DUNCAN’S can serve you better and cheaper at home? Let’s Keep our money at home by trading at home. “Hard Times” will then Become “Good Times”. C. C. Duncan, Powder Springs, Ga.

Meet me at T A P P ‘ S “The Quality Store.” “Where the nickle does its duty and your dollars have more cents” ……….. Special Sale of Overalls, Work Shirts, Pants, and Hosiery this week. One of the best Overalls made fro… 95 cents and WOrk Shirts at 59 to 99 cents. If our prices aren’t lower, buy elsewhere–full line of staple and fancy Groceries, Tobacco, Household Hardware, etc.. GET IT AL TAPP’S Powder Springs, Georgia.

Bank of Powder Springs, Powder Springs, GA. THIS BANK ENJOYS A POSITION OF STRENGTH AND SAFETY THAT IS UNQUESTIONED. MONEY DEPOSITED IN IT IS INSURED AGAINST LOSS. We solicit your banking business with the firm assurance that we can safely protect your money deposited with us and meet your every requirement in a satisfactory manner. in addition to our own resources amounting to a quarter of a million dollars, we are a member of the Depositors Guarantee Fund, amounting to a half million and have a special contract with The Bankers Trust Company with resources of more than a million dollars whereby they act as our Financial Agent……..Your account is solicited on the basis of safety and service.

Powder Springs Community Fair Pamplet – November 7, 1924 Lunch with “Uncle Ben”, B. L. Hilley, Lunch Counter and complete line of Groceries, Fresh bread daily, Ice – Delivery service.

J. M. Lovinggood & Sons, Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries, Produce a specialty. Powder Springs, Ga.

G. M. Hardage – General Department Store, Powder Springs. Dry Goods; Brandname Shoes; Men’s Clothing; Men’s Hats; Headlight and Engineer Overalls; Men’s, Boys and Ladies Underware at savings of 1 – 3; Groceries, Cottonseed meal and Hulls; Lillie Mills Flour no Better at the Price. G. M. Hardage and Luther Rice.

School Supplies, Groceries – “We want your patronage and your Friendship. Make our store your headquarters”. T. L. Lindley Undertaking Supplies a specialty.

Mableton Mail – July 5, 1961
Furr Grocery Company, Powder Springs, Ga. Advertised “Eat Better for Less”. Ham….89 cents lb; Sirloin Steak….89 cents lb; Fresh Corn…5 ears 29 cents; Purple Hull Peas…10 cents lb; Georgia Cantalope…19 cents each; Surfin Shortening…3 lb can 69 cents; Blue Plate Mayonnaise…39 cents pint.

Cotton Bill – October 7, 1909
Between J. L. Butner & Co. Cotton Buyers and General Merchants, Powder Springs, Ga., Bought from M. S. Dupree 66 bales of cotton, weight 366, price .13 cents per bale. Total paid to Mr. Dupree $47.58.

Cotton Bill – September 20, 1913
Between Hardage & McTyre, Dealers in Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal & Hulls. Dry Goods, Gents Furnishings and Shoes. Bought from Mr. M. J. Landrum 580 bales of cotton, single weight 537, price…38 cents per bale. Total due to Mr. Landrum $71.82. Mr. Landrum also purchased Guino for $25.00, which brought the amount he was paid to $46.82.