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HOME MADE FUN IN THE EARLY DAYS

Part I: LATE 1800’S AND EARLY 1900’S

Life in a small Georgia town in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s was very satisfying for young and old. This was before radio or television sets – not to mention computer’s! Here are some of those memories as told to and gathered by Sarah Frances Miller during the 1970’s and 1980’s.

Rocking chairs were dear to the hearts of Powder Springs residents in those day – both old and young. Most houses had front porches then. Almost every porch held a number of large Brumby rockers. It was unusual for some of them not to be occupied during the waking hours.

“Rocking chairs held a peculiar fascination for me”, recalls Fonnie Bullard. “At age four, I could sit sideways in a big porch rocker. I would play an imaginary piano on the arm of the chair.”

Children rocked vigorously and sang loudly, and often fell asleep in them. Ladies hurried to get through with their morning duties and their mid-day meals in order to sit in rockers on the front veranda in the shade of the huge oaks that used to line Marietta Street and the other streets of Powder Springs. The ladies would sew, read, visit or just rock and watch what was happening up and down the street, sharing gossip along the way. None of the porches were screened in the early days so fly swatters were very much in evidence.

When the gentlemen of the house came home to lunch, called dinner by most, they enjoyed the rocking chairs for a brief rest before going back to work.

After the evening meal the whole family, except those going out for some reason, gathered on the front porch to cool off, to rock and to discuss the events of the day and to catch up on the “local gossip”.

On hot summer nights the air would often be permeated with the odor of woolen rags doused in kerosene smoldering or smoking to keep the pesky mosquitoes away.

The porch swing was another popular resting place. These swings were usually suspended from the ceiling by chains. A few were on frames. Some were built for two people while others might hold four or five people according to the size of the occupants.

The front porches with their rocking chairs and swings were also used by the young people to get to know each other better – being a place for their “date” when “courting”, “sparking” and making plans for their future together as man and wife. It was a place for neighbors to gather to visit one another.

Fonnie Bullard tells this story about Murray Landrum who was stone dear. Murray ran a grist mill and worked in it all day. One Saturday afternoon he was sitting on a bench reading a news paper in front of C. M. McTyre’s Dry Goods and General Merchandise Store. At the time an itinerant street preacher was preaching. The preacher was a little irritated at Murray’s apparent lack of interest. He passed a cup around for an offering. Murray asked, “What do you want?” The preacher asked Murray, “Do you want to go to heaven?” Murray replied, “I am pretty well satisfied right here.”

Children had fun engaging in quiet games such as marbles, jackstones, thimble, blowing soap bubbles through a wooden spool, spinning a top, playing mumble peg, playing with paper dolls cut out of the Sears and Roebuck catalog. More active games included croquet. There were courts in many yards for this game. The Butner’s croquet ground was the space between the home later occupied by Walker and Ida Florence and the Methodist Parsonage. (currently the parking lot between the day care center and the funeral home). Drop the handkerchief, pop the whip, hop scotch, jump the rope, Red Rover, Fox in the War, Follow the Leader and rolling the hoop were old standbys. Many of these games are now forgotten.

Hide-and-Go-Seek was a very popular game because it could be played by just a few or many. There were many places to hide as well around the houses and the town!

County News by Correspondents Marietta Journal Oct 17, 1907

From other Towns and Localities.

WORK OF NEWS-FINDERS

All Points of the County Represented, Rural News and Fresh and Sparkling for Perusal.

POWDER SPRINGS

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tapp of Henderson, Kentucky, were recent guest of the family of Mr. W. J. Tapp.

Miss Mamie Vaughn who is attending the State Normal School at Athens, spent Saturday and Sunday with homefolk.

Mrs. Eula Williams of Acworth, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. Uriah Matthews.

Miss Lillie Mosley spent last week with relatives in Douglasville.

Mr. John Mosley spent Sunday there and accompanied Miss Lillie home.

Misses Meek of Illinois are the charming guest of their sister, Mrs. MatDorsey.

Mrs. Belle Wright, Mr. Henry Morris and Mr. and Mrs. J. E. McKenney spent last Wednesday in Atlanta. They attended the National Convention of Rural Carriers.

Mrs. T. N. Camp and son, Dillard, have returned from an extended visit to South Carolina and the Exposition.

The Powder Springs Cheese Factory

1982 interview with Ted Leake by Patti Briel:

Cotton had been the main money crop for the farmers of the area, but the arrival of the boll weevil soon put a stop to growing cotton. The farmers were hard hit with little or no money. They had to find some other means of livelihood.

The Georgia Agricultural Extension Services came to the assistance of the farmers and helped them to establish a Cheese Factory Cooperation in the region. In 1921, Powder Springs had 15 investors to put up $100 each to establish the Co-op. With the capital investment of $1,500 the factory was then opened in with E. R. (Ted) Leake accepting the position of operator and manager. The Cheese Factory was located in a four room house on Anderson Street directly behind the Southern Depot.

Member farmers, or their wives, would deliver 5 to 10 gallons of milk early each morning to be weighed and dumped into a large, double boiler style vat. The milk was then heated and chemically treated to curdle it.

Whey, a biproduct of the cheese was separated and used by the farmers to feed their hogs. The butterfat was processed and the hardened cheese was cut into rectangular pieces and placed in a 6 inch by 18 inch hoop press. After being in the press for 24 hours, the hoops of cheese were then coated with hot paraffin and left to cure.

Mr. Leake remembers eating strips of cheese that were ready for the hoop presses like it was candy.

Mr. Leake remembers some problems he had with the cheese. One is very vivid in his mind because it earned him a nickname. One day he had a cheese that looked real good, but they began to swell and swelled up as large as a watermelon. He did not know what to do so he got on the train and went to Rockmart to ask the Agricultural Extension Agent who had set up the cheese factory, what had happened and what could he do about it. Mr. Mollett told him what his problem was and how to remedy it. Mr. Leake took the next train back to Powder Springs and “fixed” his swollen cheese.

Some of the boys heard about the swollen cheese and promptly dubbed Ted Leake “The Big Cheese”, thus giving him the nickname that he was thereafter known for many years!

The Cheese Factory did well for a time. It was capable of producing 8 to 10 cheeses per day.
The cheese was sold to wholesalers in Atlanta and to local merchants, who sold it in their stores like Mr. Lovinggood’s. It gave the farmers who produced the milk some money each month as opposed to only once a year when their cotton was sold.

Even soldiers returning on furlough from World War I had heard of the cheese factory. Some were surprised at the modest operation.

Mr. Leake had a steam whistle and any leftover steam in the boilers at the end of the day was used to blow the whistle just like a large factory. This practice was not particularly popular with some of the residents.

The Cheese Factory was successful for a time. Unfortunately, when the Georgia Cheese Factories began to make an impact on the southeastern market, the major cheese manufactures in Wisconsin began to lower their prices drastically to create competition and the Co-ops like the one in Powder Springs were unable to compete with them.

As the cheese market dwindled, Mr. Leake resigned as manager and operator of the Cheese Factory. A Mr.Westbrooks and other members of the Co-op took over, but were unable to keep the factory going. They had to close the factory in 1923. After the Wisconsin cheese makers succeeded in putting the Georgia Co-ops out of business, they raised their prices.

“Moonlighting” with the Big Cheese

1982 interview with Ted Leake by Patti Briel

At the same time the “Big Cheese” was operating the Cheese Factory he was doing some of the first “Moonlighting” in Powder Springs. Mr. Leake said he didn’t know it was ‘moonlighting”
until many years later. He was holding down two jobs. Mr. Leake was also the chief electrician for the battery powered Delco Light System that served the electric power needs in Powder Springs. He went to the Cheese Factory around 5:00 am and was usually through there by noon. He then went to his job at the Delco Light System.

Harry Miller was operating the Delco Light System and had been doing it all by himself. Keeping
the plant going, making all repairs and looking after the finances. He approached Mr. Leake and asked him if he would work in the afternoons and early evenings. So, Mr. Leake took the job as the Chief Electrician for the battery powered Delco Light System. Mr. Leake thought the system was owned by stockholders and the city.

To supply the electrical demands of the town, two generators powered a bank of Delco Batteries, which were charged during the afternoon to furnish the power for the street lights, businesses and homes at night. No electrical appliances were allowed, which was not a problem because these appliances were virtually non-existent at the time. Electric lights were also limited.

There were no meters. Citizens were charged a flat fee according to the number of rooms in their houses. The bigger the house, the more they had to pay.

Kerosene was used in the motors and in 1922 and 1923 it cost from eight to ten cents a gallon. The engines were high speed and the biggest problem was keeping good spark plugs or the engines burned out quickly.

The control battery was on one end in a big glass container with a big white ball in it. When the batteries were fully or sufficiently charged, the white ball would rise to the top. When the battery was getting low, it sank to the bottom. The exhaust pipe went into an old dry well outside the building. The well was kept covered with planks. Sometimes the fumes collected in the well and a spark would start a fire. Buckets were kept under the eaves to catch rainwater which were then used when needed to douse the fire.

In the middle twenties the delco equipment was wearing out and would need to be replaced. However, it would be expensive to do so. By this time, the Georgia Power Company had come to Austell. The Power Company approached the city of Powder Springs about buying the Delco System and obtaining a franchise. The City thought it would be a wise Move and so they agreed. By 1928, The Georgia Power Company was supplying the electrical power for Powder Springs.

The Delco Electrical System was located in a building on the left side of what is now Pineview Drive, just off Marietta Street, behind the old city hall, before getting to Jackson Way and the Baptist Cemetery. At one time, Mr. Leake also had a grocery store next door. There were several other businesses on this street in the early days of the town.

Miscellaneous Articles and Advertisements

We have some interesting information from various newspapers about Powder Springs from 1910 to 1967. This is just a sampling of what you will find on file in the Research Room at the Seven Springs Museum.

Powder Springs Pioneer – 1910
JOY TO THE BANKERS HEART – This dependable man is the only one that brings joy to the banker’s heart. He is the kink the banks likes to do business with. Whatever the size of the obligation, be it $50 or $5,000, if a man cannot meet it when due, he should be at the bank “on the dot” and explain why. The bank is always ready and willing to explain anything in connection with its own business and expects its customers to do the same. A man should not have anything in his business which he cannot lay before his banker. However much he may think he has a right to cover up things regarding his business from the public, this “right” does not extend to his banker, and unless he is willing to give his banker his entire confidence he may reason to expect the assistance it is in the power of the banker to render. The joy of the banker’s heart is the man who may be absolutely depended upon first, last, and all the time. If any young man starting in business has an idea that character is not a business asset of the highest order, let him talk to some banker about it and he will have cause to change his mind. We solicit the business of a few more dependable men. BANK OF POWDER SPRINGS, J. M. COMER, Cashier. (Note: Wonder how much business this really generated for the bank????)

Marietta Journal – August 4, 1921
M. W. COMPTON Specializes in Staple and Fancy Groceries ALSO a full Line of Cold, Bottled Drinks, and Tobaccos – both Chewing and smoking. My prices on FEED STUFF, SHOES, DRY GOODS, HARDWARE, HARNESS, COLLARS, BRIDLES Cannot be surpassed in Marietta or Atlanta. You will save time, a long haul and money to see me about any of these things you need. Whatever you want you can get at COMPTON’S. Powder Springs, Ga.

B. L. HILLEY – Headquarters for Cold Drinks and Hot Lunches. The only restaurant in Powder Springs. I cater to your Stomach. See me for Candies and Fancy Groceries. Powder Springs, Ga.

DUNCAN’S GARAGE – Overhauls Ford Motors and makes the work whether they want to or not. We also specialize in General Repair Work on ALL Makes of Cars. In charging storage batteries; In Vulcanizing Castings and Tubes WE CARRY ALL KINDS OF PARTS, OILS AND GASOLINE. Our services cannot be surpassed in this section of The state and what is still —- OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST —- That can be found, considering the services rendered. Why go elsewhere When DUNCAN’S can serve you better and cheaper at home? Let’s Keep our money at home by trading at home. “Hard Times” will then Become “Good Times”. C. C. Duncan, Powder Springs, Ga.

Meet me at T A P P ‘ S “The Quality Store.” “Where the nickle does its duty and your dollars have more cents” ……….. Special Sale of Overalls, Work Shirts, Pants, and Hosiery this week. One of the best Overalls made fro… 95 cents and WOrk Shirts at 59 to 99 cents. If our prices aren’t lower, buy elsewhere–full line of staple and fancy Groceries, Tobacco, Household Hardware, etc.. GET IT AL TAPP’S Powder Springs, Georgia.

Bank of Powder Springs, Powder Springs, GA. THIS BANK ENJOYS A POSITION OF STRENGTH AND SAFETY THAT IS UNQUESTIONED. MONEY DEPOSITED IN IT IS INSURED AGAINST LOSS. We solicit your banking business with the firm assurance that we can safely protect your money deposited with us and meet your every requirement in a satisfactory manner. in addition to our own resources amounting to a quarter of a million dollars, we are a member of the Depositors Guarantee Fund, amounting to a half million and have a special contract with The Bankers Trust Company with resources of more than a million dollars whereby they act as our Financial Agent……..Your account is solicited on the basis of safety and service.

Powder Springs Community Fair Pamplet – November 7, 1924 Lunch with “Uncle Ben”, B. L. Hilley, Lunch Counter and complete line of Groceries, Fresh bread daily, Ice – Delivery service.

J. M. Lovinggood & Sons, Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries, Produce a specialty. Powder Springs, Ga.

G. M. Hardage – General Department Store, Powder Springs. Dry Goods; Brandname Shoes; Men’s Clothing; Men’s Hats; Headlight and Engineer Overalls; Men’s, Boys and Ladies Underware at savings of 1 – 3; Groceries, Cottonseed meal and Hulls; Lillie Mills Flour no Better at the Price. G. M. Hardage and Luther Rice.

School Supplies, Groceries – “We want your patronage and your Friendship. Make our store your headquarters”. T. L. Lindley Undertaking Supplies a specialty.

Mableton Mail – July 5, 1961
Furr Grocery Company, Powder Springs, Ga. Advertised “Eat Better for Less”. Ham….89 cents lb; Sirloin Steak….89 cents lb; Fresh Corn…5 ears 29 cents; Purple Hull Peas…10 cents lb; Georgia Cantalope…19 cents each; Surfin Shortening…3 lb can 69 cents; Blue Plate Mayonnaise…39 cents pint.

Cotton Bill – October 7, 1909
Between J. L. Butner & Co. Cotton Buyers and General Merchants, Powder Springs, Ga., Bought from M. S. Dupree 66 bales of cotton, weight 366, price .13 cents per bale. Total paid to Mr. Dupree $47.58.

Cotton Bill – September 20, 1913
Between Hardage & McTyre, Dealers in Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal & Hulls. Dry Goods, Gents Furnishings and Shoes. Bought from Mr. M. J. Landrum 580 bales of cotton, single weight 537, price…38 cents per bale. Total due to Mr. Landrum $71.82. Mr. Landrum also purchased Guino for $25.00, which brought the amount he was paid to $46.82.

Powder Springs Ordinance Book of 1898

Powder Springs Charter Amended

An Act to amend an Act incorporating the town of Powder Springs in Cobb County, providing for the election of Mayor, Council, Marshal, Clerk, and to define their powers, duties, etc., approved September 18, 1883, so as to more accurately define and fix the limits of said Town of Powder Springs; to authorize said officers to levy and collect taxes, lay out and improve streets and otherwise increase the powers and duties of said officers, and for other purposes.

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, That from and after the passage of this Act, Section 2 of said Act, approved September 18, 1883, be stricken, and in lieu thereof the following be passed, to be known as Section 2 of said Act, and to read as follows:

Section 2. The corporate limits of said Town shall be defined as follows, to-wit:……… Beginning on the west side of Powder Springs at the bridge over Powder Springs Creek, and running down the creek south, making the east side of the creek the line a distance of five hundred yards; thence east to the south corner of the cemetery on the road leading to Austell; thence north along the east side of said cemetery back to Atlanta Road; thence across said Marietta Street to the North Marietta road and running on the east side of said road to the north line of the Colored Church property; thence west parallel with Marietta Street along the branch of the junction of the Dallas and Lost Mountain road; thence west along the south side of the Dallas Road a distance of two hundred yards; thence south to the Powder Springs Creek; thence south down the creek to the beginning corner. (Pages 3 and 4 of Ordinance Book 1898)

Last page of the Ordinance Book 18981 – Sec. 92. The foregoing Ordinances, prepared and compiled by W. W. Scott, for the Town of Powder Springs, are hereby adopted and all Ordinances conflicting with the foregoing or any part thereof are hereby repealed.
Passed by Council, Feb 7th, 1898.

W. W. Scott, Mayor, (L.S.). Z. B. Moon, Clerk (L. S.)

The Ordinance Book is on file in the Research Room at Seven Springs Museum. There are various other ordinances regarding the streets, property, livestock, public health concerns, etc. in this 10 plus page booklet. Makes for very interesting reading.

Powder Springs City Cemetery, 1917

The Powder Springs City Cemetery is located on the west side of Old Austell Road down from the intersection with Atlanta Street and across from the Methodist Cemetery. It was established in 1917 as part of the Methodist Cemetery but later became the City Cemetery. Sometimes it has been confused as being the Baptist Cemetery or part of the Methodist Cemetery.

The earliest markers are 1903 and 1905 for Landers Infants (M.A.J. and F.E. Landers) and 1916 Frances E. Landers (1865-1916) w/o M.A.J. Landers. According to family members, these graves were moved actually moved here M.A.J. Landers died in 1954 by his and Frances’ sons, George Landers and Robert (Bob) Landers. (note: information on file with Seven Springs Historical Society, archived at the Seven Springs Museum at the Bodiford House.)

The first burial was actually in May of 1917 and that of Everett McCord (1914-1917), s/o M/M F.O. McCord (Floyd). The next were in 1918 in February of Alfred Lee Elrod (1906-1918) and in October of Yancy Amos Boynton (1849-1918).

There is a small wooded area with an iron bench, at the front of the cemetery, on Old Austell Road. This area was established in 1978 by the Mimosa Garden Club of Powder Springs. Club Member, Mrs. Faye (Fae) Lindley inspired the Garden Club Members to set this area up as a Mediation Garden for all to enjoy.

In the Powder Springs City Cemetery are buried some of the members of the early families of Powder Springs. There are also those who came later to settle and open businesses, live here and/or live and work in the surrounding counties. Some are Veterans who served in the military during war and piece time. Some are merchants, tradesmen, businessmen, doctors, educators, pastors, mayors, councilmen, baseball players, every day citizens.

These are Lander’s, Lindley’s, Bone’s, Cassell’s, Lovinggood’s, McTyre’s, Hunter’s, Bodiford’s, Moon’s, Leake’s, Tapp’s, Furr’s, Abernathy’s, Hardy’s, Brumbelow’s, Fambrough’s, Sailors, Camps, Rakestraw’s, Miller’sNorrises, Lawler’s and Porter’s.

Mimosa Garden Club (1940-2013) – Charter Members: Martha Monte Brooks Brown (Mrs. James Kirk Brown) (1908-1995); Verna Norris Lawler (1912-1991); India Culpepper Norris (mother of Verna N. Lawler) (1894- 1977); Frances May Norris (Mrs. K.E. Norris) (1919-2007); Estelle Leake Tapp (Mrs. W.R. Tapp, Sr.) (1892-1979); Mrs. W.L. (Gladys) Jennings (1899-1958) and Mrs. M.J. (Mary) Miller (1909-1993, Secretary of the Club.

Powder Springs Women’s Club (1959-2016) – Charter Members: Kathrine Mellichamp (1920-2005) Founder/Organizer and President of the Club. Mary Holbrook Miller (Mrs. M.J. Miller) (1909-1993).

Powder Springs Baseball Players of 1920’s and 1930’s: Walter Lamar Jennings (1899-1964); Tom N. Scott (1906-1978) and Red (Lewis Clement) Lawler (1908-1988).

Powder Springs Baseball Players in 1947 and 1948: James Harold Duke (1927-2001); Marion Walton “Buddy” McTyre (1927-2009) and Thomas Harold Moon (1925-2014) and a WWII Veteran.

Push Rods – est 1950 – Charter Members: Russell Hunter (1937-2009); Guy Sheldon Camp (1931-1980); George Washington Eubanks, Sr. (1905-1961); George Washington Eubanks, Jr. (1933-1955); Jack Lane (A.J. Lane, III) (1938-1969); Jimmy L. Meadows (1936-2008) and Virgil Purvis, Jr. (1933-1960).

Mayors: M.A.J. Landers (1865-1954); Thomas Newton Compton (1909- 1978) served 1957-1962 and 1967-1970. Compton Elementary School is named after Mr. Compton. Richard D. Sailors, Sr., (1938-2015) served 1987-2000 and Fred Brady (1933-1957).

Mayor of Hiram: Joseph Millard Harshbarger (1881-1958) served 1928-1931, 1936-1943 and 1946-1947.

Powder Springs City Councilmen: William Buren Turner, Sr. (1917-2003) and a WWII Veteran. Fred Brady (1933-1957) owned furniture store in downtown Powder Springs and Brady’s Grocery Store (located where the shopping center is next door to BP Station at intersection with Powder Springs Road and Austell Powder Springs Road). These are just a few of the Mayors and Councilmen who may be buried in this cemetery.

Powder Springs Chief of Police: William Hugh Poore (1905-1990) served 1943, 1954, and 1969. He was a member of the Powder Springs Baseball Team in 1947 and 1948 where he also served as coach.

Doctors: Dr. Frank Pickens Lindley, Sr. (1890-1953). Dr. A. J. “Doc” Lane, Jr. (1912-1990) Druggist – Lane Drug Store in downtown Powder Springs.

William Robert Landers (1888-1982) one of first City Mail Carriers in 1964 and a WWI Veteran. Edgar R. “Ted” Leake (1905-1992) Postmaster 1962-1963. Estelle Leake Tapp (1892-1979) Postmistress 1935-1962. Mason Jones (M.J.) Miller (1911-1989) Mail Carrier and Georgia “Ray” Hardy (1927-2005) Postal Clerk. Both served for many years.

Rev. J. M. Spinks (1851-1939) Pastor First Baptist Church of Powder Springs 1895-1904 and 1905-1911 (Total of 15 years). Prior to being Ordained in 1889, Rev. Spinks practiced law in Dallas; represented Paulding County in the State Legislature in 1884 and 1885 and was Editor of the Dallas New Era Newspaper.

Rev. Robert Jehu Smith, Sr. (1894-1961) Pastor First Baptist Church of Powder Springs 1932-1937. Rev. James “Jimmy” McClellan Ford (1934-2013) retired United Methodist Minister.

Rev. Marvin J.W. “Doc” Frady (1934-2016) Pastor Clarkdale First Baptist Church; Chaplin of Cobb County Sheriff’s Office; Chaplin to House of Representatives and State Senate of Georgia; helped build Corner Baptist Church and served as Music Director and a former Chiropractor.

Frank Picken “Pick” Lindley, Jr. (1917-1985) owner and director of Lindley Funeral Home from 1937 when he took over from his Grandfather until he sold the business in 1968 to Gene Davis. Pick was also a WWII Veteran. The funeral home went through several owners, Marion
Turk, Dennis Bellamy and currently Dwayne Green. Warren Watson “Pinky” Jennings (1915-1998) started work for Lindley Funeral Home in 1936 and stayed throughout all owners until he retired from Bellamy Funeral Home in 1997. Serving for 60 years.

M.A.J. Landers (1865-1954) Matthew Andrew Jackson “Jack” or ‘MAJ” Landers was a businessman, merchant, and Mayor of Powder Springs. He ran a hardware store downtown, a construction company, a feed mill, and an automobile dealership (perhaps the first in Powder Springs). As Mayor he initiated the first city owned water works in 1934 with $12,000 that he backed with his own money. He aided with essential supplies from his store to the City of Gainesville during their recovery after the tornado of 1936 devastated that city.

Virgil A. Lovinggood, Sr. ((1888-1985) was a businessman in downtown who operated Lovinggoods Store for nearly 50 years. He sold all manner of goods and merchandise, never turning away those in need. His family operated a sorghum mill. He was a prosperous farmer prior to purchasing the store and continued to farm. He raised his own produce and livestock. You would find these products – syrup, produce, meat, dairy items and even a new product called “Coke” in his general store.

Charles Marshall McTyre (1875-1960) operated a cotton gin (McTyre’s Cotton Gin) and a general store in downtown.

Earl “Bug” Porter, Jr. (1927-2011) continued to operate Porter’s Garage and Powder Springs Service Station after his father Earl Porter Sr. (1896-1978) passed away. Bug also owned and operated the Powder Springs Lawn Mower Shop. Bug and his service station were a well loved fixture in downtown Powder Springs for many years. He was also a WWII Veteran.

Wallace McSel Pearson (1917-2012) was a contractor, builder and painter who was well known in Powder Springs and the surrounding Counties. He was a Director for 23 years with Greystone Powder Corporation and a WWII Veteran.

Elmer Gladney (E.G.) Wylie, Jr (1926-2012) Powder Springs Businessman, founder of Carter Concrete, Wylie’s Insulation (Rainey Brothers), a builder and contractor. Mr. Wylie was one of the original Directors of the Powder Springs/Cobb County Bank established in 1969. (which has, over time, became part of current day Wells Fargo Bank).He is a Veteran of WWII and Korea – U.S. Army and Air Force.

Aaron Grady Grier (1895-1985) was a man who loved people and was always actively involved with his church, the schools, and was always
kind and thoughtful. Mr. Grier was a school bus driver and school crossing guard for many years. He worked at Powder Springs Elementary School, Tapp Middle School and Milford Elementary School.

In August of 1988, the Powder Springs City Council recognized Mr. Grier’s service to and love of the children and people of Powder Springs by naming the new street leading to the new Powder Springs Elementary School “Grady Grier Drive” in his honor.

Estie Mae Norris (1915-2014) was a long time member of the Seven Springs Historical Society and Museum and the Powder Springs Senior
Citizens Center. Estie was known as the “Quilt Lady” for all the quilts she made or helped make during her lifetime. She made and donated 20 handmade quilts to the used as fund raisers for the Seven Springs Historical Society and Museum. These were usually raffled off in December of each year. She was a hard worker, respected and loved by many people.

Margaret Virginia Tapp (1911-1992) was a history teacher in Cobb County for many years. She was the Historian of the First Baptist Church of Powder Springs and author of two volumes of their history. “The History of the First Baptist Church of Powder Springs, GA.”. Miss Tapp was also one of the Historians of Powder Springs.

Charles Haskell Harper (1909-1969) a photo compositor for Atlanta Newspaper, Inc.

Henry Wilbur Dewberry (1902-1975) a Mortician and Director for several large Funeral Homes in the Atlanta area, including Austin Dill Funeral Home.

William Roy “Bill” Tapp, Jr. (1922-2011) served as an engineering draftsman in 1943 for WWII Bombers. Then, in 1945, as part of an Anti Sub Fleet. By trade Mr. Tapp was an architect for many of the buildings, homes, schools, public/government facilities around and in Atlanta, Fulton County, Cobb County, Douglas County and City of Marietta. Mr. Tapp designed the initial Campus and buildings of the Southern Polytechnic State University, now Kennesaw State University. Mr. Tapp also designed the First Baptist Church of Powder Springs church building in 1964.

Robert Graham Bodiford (1921-2012) moved his family to Powder Springs when he purchased the Queen Anne Style Home on Marietta Street in 1954. He worked at Lockheed as an Aeronautical Engineer. Mr. Bodiford was always active in the community serving as a City Councilman for many years. He was active in his church and the Powder Springs School systems. He was also a long time and active member of the Seven SpringsHistorical Society and the Seven Springs Museum.

George Landers (1886-1987) was a farmer and the son of M.A.J.Landers (1865-1954) and Frances E. Landers (1865-1916). He lived on the corner of Atlanta Street and Marchman Street. In 1985, the City purchased Mr. Landers home and moved it to the Park on Brownsville Road and rebuilt it as a cabin for the Seven Springs Museum. The Museum remained there for thirty years.

In 2014, the City of Powder Springs purchased the home from the Bodiford Estate and renovated it to house the Seven Springs Museum. In October of 2015, the home opened as the Seven Springs Museum at the Bodiford House. The artifacts that were housed at the old Museum that was located in the Park on Brownsville Road, were now in a new home preserving the history of Powder Springs for everyone to enjoy.

There are also numerous Veterans from various wars buried here. These are only a few of those Veterans. A “Thank You” always to all our Veterans no matter when or how they served their country. World War I – Charlie R. Strickland (1892-1953); Hubbard Rakestraw (1894-1970); Milton A Hill (1891-1955); John Hansel Baggett, Jr. (1897-1977); George M. Furr (1891-1980); Grady Mark Moon (1890-1971); James Franklin (1891-1951) Regt FA Repl Draft and Tally L. Umphrey (1893-1965). Brothers George P. Stansell (1889-1973) and Victor H. Stansell (1892-1972).

World War II – Paul Clay Honea (1924-1961); Charles Robert Leake (1924-1982); George Robert Landers (1920-1989); Charles Comer “Charlie” Turner (1912-1979); Robert Lee Wehunt (1928-1978); Richard Porter (1922-2001); Everett Milton Furr (1924-2011); Jake H. Cole (1919-1999); James Paul Cornwell (1915-1966) and John Edward Davis (1920-1980).

World War I and II – Dewey Edgar “Duke” Howard (1899-1965)

Korea – Donald Joseph Howard, Sr. (1932-2004); Robert H. Scott (1930-1984); Guy Shelton Camp (1931-1980) and John L. Beavers (1930-1992).

Vietnam – Robert Lloyd Doss, Jr. (1946-2008); Robert Steven Akin (1948-2006); John L. Beavers (1930-1982); Donald Aaron Pigg (1946-1977) and William D. Fisher (1949-1971) SP4 9 Army Band.

Korea and Vietnam – Wilton V. Woods (1930-1981) and Jack Edwin Gray (1933-1976).

There is also a marker for military service in memory of Hugh D. Hudson (1914-1943), Veteran of WWII, who died on the Island of Corsica in the line of duty. He was the son of Fred and Bertha Hudson.

There are memorial markers throughout the cemetery honoring the lives and families of those buried here in their final resting place. There are also markers honoring the memory of those who, for some reason, could not actually be buried here.

All those buried here have, through their lives, in some way, helped make their communities a better place to live for everyone.

The Powder Springs City Cemetery has approximately 1700 graves. There is still room for other family members and possibly other future burials today in 2019.

The Powder Springs City Cemetery is maintained by the Powder Springs Cemetery Association which was incorporated as a non-profit organization in 1989. Frank Moon, Jr. was the original worker to get this group working to provide perpetual care for this cemetery and the Methodist Cemetery.

Powder Springs Memorial Gardens

Powder Springs Memorial Gardens was established in 1970 and is located on Atlanta Street near the intersection with Old Austell Road. The Gardens also back up to the Powder Springs City Cemetery located on Old Austell Road.

The first burials were the next year in March of 1971. March: William Doyle “Billy” Mitchell. April: Floyd Phillip Cooper, Jr., USAF; Homer Lee Echols and Ethel Inez Meadows. May: Dorothy Brand Hulsey. September: Bluford K. Byess and Paul Daniel Currier.

In the Memorial Gardens are buried those who were businessmen and tradesmen in Powder Springs, Cobb County and the surrounding areas. Some were veterans who served in war and peace times. Some were doctors, educators, pastors, mayors, councilmen, baseball players and farmers. There are families of the names Abernathy, Baggett, Brown, Cooper, Croker, Haynie, Hunter, Kellett, Long, Meadows, and Porter.

Powder Springs Baseball Players of 1920s and 30s: John B. McTyre (1901-1972) and Paul Edwin Hilley (1912-2000).

Powder Springs Baseball Players of 1947-48: Ty C. Porter (1925-1986) and Carol Edward Moon (1929-2011). Mr. Moon was also involved with the Powder Springs Baseball Association working for many years.

Push Rods – est 1950 – Charter Members: Wendell Gunnell (1932-2000); Sammy (Samuel) Hardy (1938-1996) and Arthur Clay (A.C.) Hunter (1911-1999).

Mayors: Gene Jackson (1926-2005) served 1965-66 and twice as a City Councilman, 1958-59 and 1962-64. Mr. Jackson was also Road Superintendent for Cobb County and a charter member of Doss Memorial Baptist Church. Roy C. Kellet (1925-2005) served 1971-1974 and was a WWII Veteran. Franklin Boyd “Doc” Chastain (1934-1992) served in military in 1951.

Powder Springs City Councilmen: Robert Ervin (R.E.) Long Jr. (1932-2009). Mr. Long was also on the board of directors for Austell Gas System for 43 years. He was President of the C&S Bank of Austell. After 45 years of service in the banking industry, he retired from Bank of America. Joseph Paul Bourassa, Sr. (1927-2010). Mr. Bourassa was also a Past Commander for the American Legion Post #294.

Theses are just a few of the Mayors and City Councilmen who may be buried in this cemetery.

Rudolph Byars Kellett (1927-2006) Postmaster 1963-1975. Charles Robert (Bob) Burkett (1922-2014) was a Rural Mail Carrier. Sewell L. Kellett (1930-1998) was one of the first City Mail Carriers in 1964.

Louise P. Clonts (1905-1993) long time teacher at Powder Springs High School and Powder Springs Elementary School. Bonnie Mercedes Keplinger Ray (1937-2018) taught at Compton Elementary, Tapp and Smitha Middle Schools. Mrs. Alta Harris Hardy (1924-2011) served for many years as a cook at Powder Springs Elementary School System for 33 years.

Vessie Frances Thomas Geen (1916-2002) was one of the five graduated from the first graduating class of Powder Springs High School in 1934.

John “Butch” Davis, Jr. (1961-2011) former owner of Powder Springs Amoco Station (now BP Station) and owner of West Cobb Towing.

John Hiram McTyre (1913-2005) Railroad Switchman.

Powder Springs Youth (Baseball) Association: Charles Robert “Bob” Burkett (1922-2014) Baseball coach for many years. He also coached football at McEachern and was involved with the Boy Scouts. Carl Moon (1929-2011) coached baseball for many years. Joseph Paul Bourassa (1927-2010) was a president and coach of the organization. Stephen Lynn Tessereau (1954-2017) coached Powder Springs Storm Baseball Team and was known as “Coach Steve”. e was also affiliated with McEachern High School’s Seventh Grade Baseball Team.

James Edward Wilson (1941-2007) established Wilson Air Conditioning Service in 1969. He served in Vietnam and was the recipient of the Purple Heart for his service.

Marcus D. Abernathy (1918-1990) worked for Lindley Funeral Home and Bellamy Funeral Home for 60 years. He also served in WWII.

Howard H. Croker (1924-1988) owner Croker Wrecker Company and a used car lot in Powder Springs for many years. He also served in WWII.

James Wesley Chambley (1932-2015) owner of Javelin Printing Company in Atlanta.

Rev. Robert D. Bitterman (1932-2003) was a pastor in Ohio for over 50 years before moving to Powder Springs in 1997. Here he continued working in the missionary evangelist field and pastoral training. Rev. Bitterman was a member of Calvary Baptist Church in Austell.

Stuart B. Powell (1922-2001) a retired City of Atlanta police officer after 30 years of service. He was also a WWII veteran.

Larry Barkwell (1940-1973) worked for the Atlanta Police Department. Killed in the line of duty. Jerry Barkwell (1940-1983) Sheriff’s Department, Brevard County, Florida. Twin brothers, both in law enforcement.

Chief David Wilson Hilton (1937-2016) worked for the Atlanta Fire Department 1955-64 and simultaneously as Fire Chief of the Powder Springs Fire Department until 1971 when it was consolidated into the Cobb County Fire Department. Throughout his career he developed and helped develop various safety procedures for the fire departments. He developed the Emergency 911 System, Georgia’s first Fire Education Department, Fire Arson Investigation, implemented Emergency Medical Service for Cobb County, Residential Fire Code with sprinkler system for buildings across the nation and internationally–just to name a few. Chief Hilton received many awards (local and national) through his career for his achievements and accomplishments. Also, through the years he worked with various youth organizations and his church. He was a charter member of Macland Baptist Church. Chief Hilton retired in 1994.

There are also numerous veterans from various wars buried here. There are only a few of those veterans. A “Thank You” always to all our veterans no matter when or how they served their country.

World War I – Plumer Talmadge Boyd (1895-1957) GA PVT Co G1 Inf Repl Regt (Infantry Replacement Regiment) and John H. Settlemire (1895-1986). Mr. Settlemire also served in WWII.

World War II – George Washington Awtrey, Jr. (1922-2013) served in the Navy and was decorated three times for his service: Joseph Preston Carter (1914-1994); Irene Kellett (1923-1987); George M. Haynie (1920-1991); Harkless M. “Hark” Kinsey (1919-2013); J. Walden (J.W.) Taylor (1923-2013) received Air Medal for Flying 50 missions over South Pacific; Furman T. Finch (1927-1999); Samuel Paul Thomason (1923-2008) and Jessie Leroy Long, Jr. (1923-2002) in Coast Guard.

Korea – Carolyn Anne Lester Piper (1932-2015) Army as Cryptographer 1950-52; James Harle Elbon, Jr. (1929-1997); Billy Crabbe (1932-2014) and served after the war as a pastor for over 40 years. Verlon Edward Maxwell (1922-1999).

Korea and Vietnam – Dennis E. Couch (1933-2018): James H. McFarland (1930-2004) and John H. Vann, Jr. (1933-1987).

Vietnam – Jackie Wright Allen (1939-2005); Bobby G. Bookout (1946-2017): Dr. SIlas W. (Wayne) Brown (1949-1985): Harold George Cantrell (1932-2006); Russell C. Mountcastle II (1935-2001) and Roland Kirk Rakestraw (1938-1999).

There is a marker for military service in memory of PO Joel Candler Stephens (1943-1968) who was lost at sea approximately 400 miles SW of the Azores eastern edge of Sargasso Sea in 1968.

There are memorial markers throughout the cemetery honoring the lives and families of those buried here in their final resting place. There are also markers honoring the memory of those who, for some reason, could not actually be buried here.

There is an American flag along the entrance to the cemetery. The marker has emblems of the U. S. Military Forces. Below these emblems it reads: ” Flags Flying in Memory of…”

All who are buried here have, in some way, all through their lives, helped make their communities a better place to live for all generations.

The Powder Springs Memorial Garden currently has over 1250 graves. However, there is still more room for future burials today in 2019.

The Memory Gardens is a perpetual care cemetery and is associated with the Sunrise Memorial Gardens in Douglasville.

Church of God of Prophecy Cemetery

Powder Springs, Georgia
1960

The Church of God of Prophecy Cemetery was established in 1960 and is located behind the Powder Springs Christian Fellowship Center at 4050 Austell-Powder Springs Road. This was the original Church of God Prophecy built in 1960. The cemetery backs up to the Methodist Cemetery.

The first burial was in December of 1960 of Eric Glenn Gilmer, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Lamar Gilmer.

The Church of God of Prophecy was organized in 1937. Their first church was built below Clarkdale in 1939-40. They sold that property and built a new church building in Powder Springs at 4050 Austell-Powder Springs Road in 1959-60. Ralph E. Bryant was pastor.

The church later built a new home just down the street at 4263 Austell-Powder Springs Road. Their original building is now used as Powder Springs Christian Fellowship Center.

In the Church of God Cemetery are buries church members and their families.

There are two graves at the edge of the woods on the right as you enter the cemetery. Alfonso D. Thompkins (1874-1949) and Fanny G. Thompkins (1895-1970). These graves are part of the Methodist Cemetery and not the Church of God Cemetery.

Charter Members of the Church: Elsie Ingram Hembree (1900-1980) and James Homer Hembree (1895-1972).

Members of the Building Committee 1959-1960: T. W. “Dutch” Ballew (1896-1970), Chairman; C. M. (Clyde Miron) Elsberry (1920-1984) also a WWII Veteran and Ernest J. Gordon (1989-1975).

Pastor of Church of God: Reverend Clifton L. Summerall, Sr. (1922-2011) beloved Minister who served twice. His wife, Ida Belle Spear Summerall(1923-2003) is buried by his side.

Annie Jane Summerall Herrin (1942-2015) who served as church Clerk/Treasurer, Sunday School Teacher and Praise and Worship Leader. She retired from Bank of America in Austell after thirty-five years of service.

Annie Mary Gordon (1914-2006) retired spinner from Coats and Clark in Clarkdale.

Marcie Hembree Hooks (1941-2013) retired from Richs-Macys after twenty-three years as secretary.

Marilyn Minter Ingram Stephens (1937-2013) served in the Music Ministry of the church for over sixty years.

There are also several Veterans from various wars buried here. These listed here are some of those Veterans. A “Thank You” always to all our Veterans no matter when or how they served their country.

World War II – C. B. Cleveland (1903-2000); James Wilson Griffin, Sr. (1925-1978); Jackson Edward Barnett (1926-2007); Howard Grady Bell (1918-1973); Ides William Gramling (1920-1993); Howard P. Pharr (1920-1981); Earl Neil White (1920-1999) and Rufus Lowell White (1917-2005). Earl Neil White and Rufus Lowell White were brothers.

Korea – Doyle F. Minter (1933-1975).

Vietname – Ken Murray (1933-1995).

There are memorial markers honoring the lives and families that are buried here in their final resting place.

The Church of God Cemetery has between 90-100 graves.

The cemetery is sometimes referred to as the Powder Springs Christian Fellowship Cemetery.

Al those buried here have left our community a better place to live, touching many lives along the way.

Note: The history of the church was taken from the information compiled by Annie Mary Gordon and Doris Hembree Gramling in the 1980s and 90s at the request of Sarah Frances Miller and Virginia Tapp. The information these two ladies provided are part of the archives of the Seven Springs Historical Society and housed at the Seven Springs Museum at the Bodiford House. We are indebted to these two gracious ladies for sharing this with us.

The Seven Springs of Powder Springs

The history of Powder Springs is the history of the relationship between the people and the seven spring located here. The area was originally part of the Cherokee Indian Nation. These seven springs were well known to Indians. The Cherokee and Creek called the site Gunpowder Springs because of the mineral bearing Sulfur and blackish sediment in the springs. The sediment was said to be ‘as dry as powder when the water runoff’. The Indians used the water of the springs for medicinal value. They would bring their sick to the springs to take advantage of the curative power of the minerals.

Pioneers, or white settlers, began settling the area as early as 1819. The village became a center for commerce. The springs were the town’s water supply.

The town was often referred to as The Springs, Springville or Gunpowder Springs. It was not until 1838 that the town had an official name. On December 29, 1838, the town was incorporated as Springville and the first Post Office was established. Then, on December 19, 1859, the town was incorporated as Powder Springs. Powder Springs may have been referred to as Seven Springs at times but was never officially named such.

MINERALS FOUND IN THE SPRINGS: Silica, Chlorine, Sulfur, Trioxide, Carbon Dioxide, Sodium Dioxide, Potassium Oxide, Lime, Magnesia, Phosphorus Pent Oxide, Arsenic, Hydrogen Sulphide, Alumina, Ferric Oxide and Lithia. (Information from the Geological Survey of Georgia Bulletin No. 20: A Preliminary Report on the Mineral Springs of Georgia).

The water table is very near the surface and there are many springs. All of the springs are small and none of them furnishing more than a gallon a minute.

Locations of the Seven Springs

The Spring located in the City of Powder Springs Park by Powder Creek was the most popular. It supplied water for the town of Powder Springs for many years as its only public water supply.

Across Highway 278 (Marietta Street) from the Lovinggood house located at the Brownsville Road intersection between the road and the railroad tracts.

Near the Southern Railroad (CSX) tracks by Long Street is close to the back of the last baseball field in Powder Springs Park and behind the house of Naomi Marshall.

In back of the Magnolia House on Marietta Street.

In the back of the W. R. Tapp House. A white frame house next to The First Baptist Church on Marietta Street. The spring continues behind the church’s sanctuary.

In back of the Service Stations on Marietta Street between New Macland Road and Siniard Street.

Located behind the second house west of LaFayette Drive (Florence Estates Subdivision) at 4245 Atlanta Street. This was the former home of Homer Scott (female) and the location of the Powder Springs Academy. The young boys who went there to school considered it an honor of being chosen to bring a bucket of water from the springs for the other students.

Powder Springs Cured Ailments

In the 1850s, Powder Springs was a health resort. Doctors prescribed a trip to the springs and treatments of various lengths for patients with serious kidney and bladder diseases, W.R. Tapp, Sr., was told by some of the oldest citizens that there was a hotel and a sanatorium in the park at the spring, that the hotel was destroyed by fire in 1859, and that the sanatorium disappeared in a few years. The Civil War put an end to Powder Springs as a health resort according to an account in the Mableton Mail, July 8, 1961. “The original building was a two-story one at the site of the pump house in the park. It was the town’s club house before the War of 1861 and reconstruction days.” This building could have been the one used as a sanatorium before the hotel burned.

According to Miss Roberta Murray, “In the early days of Springville (Powder Springs) the Pavilion was at the site where the brick pump house now stands in the city park. Powder Creek would overflow after rains and it interfered with the social life so the early settlers and their slaves cut a canal and changed the course of Powder Creek and built the present pavilion before the Civil War.”

From 1880 through the early 1900s, the park and spring attracted groups from neighboring communities and from Atlanta for recreational purposes. School groups, clubs and church groups picnicked then enjoyed the dance pavilion, the ball diamond, wading in the shallow water of Powder Creek and fishing in the deeper holes, horseshoe pitching, picking blackberries and other wild fruits, and spreading their lunches in the shade of the trees. The Southern Railroad ran special excursion trains in the summers, beginning in 1882, to Powder Springs. If the picnickers wanted to go riding around the country side, they could go to the Lindley Livery Stable and rent horses, buggies, carriages and wagons.

Political rallies and family reunions were held at the springs. Wheat Street Baptist Church from Atlanta had a picnic there. Local people had dances, wiener roasts, marshmallow toastings, box suppers, community sings and games of various kinds at the park. On Sunday afternoons the spring was a favorite gathering place for the young ladies and gentlemen of the town.

Printed in The Historical News Cobb & Douglas County, January 2018 – Info gathered by Sarah Frances Miller & Roberta Murray in the 1970s

Newsletter

Attention genealogy enthusiasts!
We’ve started a free Genealogy Group here at the museum. It meets on the last Thursday of each month at 6:00 PM. Everyone is welcome to join! If you have any questions, please contact us. Thank you!

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